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Posts for category: In the News

By contactus@napeds.com
September 26, 2014
Category: In the News
Tags: Untagged

Parenting Workshop with
Dr. Jonathan Schwab, Sharon Saline, Psy.D. and other speakers

Sunday, October 5, 2014
4:30pm to 6:00pm 
193 Locust St., Northampton

Please RSVP by calling  
413-517-2226 or email alok@napeds.com
Light refreshments will be served.

ABC's of ADHD: Elementary School Years
This talk will answer your questions about the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD/ADD as well as what interventions would be most helpful for you, your child and your family.

click the link below to view the poster

Parenting Workshops 2014-2015

By contactus@napeds.com
September 25, 2014
Category: In the News
Tags: Untagged

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) announced a confirmed case of Enterovirus D68 on September 23, 2014.  The patient is a school aged child with a history of asthma who became ill in early September and has since been treated and released from an area hospital.  Please see the attached DPH Fact Sheet about enterovirus D68.

Various enteroviruses and other respiratory infections may also circulate at this time of year.  Enteroviruses cause respiratory and gastrointestinal illness, rash, and neurologic illnesses, such as aseptic meningitis and encephalitis.  While most infections cause mild or no symptoms, some can be severe.  The current outbreak of enterovirus D68 has been predominantly associated with respiratory disease and not nervous system infection. 

Patients with asthma have been experiencing more severe symptoms, like they would with any respiratory infection.  Clinicians should ensure that patients with asthma have an asthma action plan.  Reinforce use of this plan and, including adherence to long term control medication.  Encourage people with asthma who are experiencing an exacerbation to seek care early.

The advisory and fact sheet will be posted on the MDPH web site.  You may also want to see CDC’s Enterovirus  D68 website for more information.  

 MDPH Fact Sheet Enterovirus D68                                  

By contactus@napeds.com
August 19, 2014
Category: In the News
Tags: Untagged


Consumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Recall date: AUGUST 19, 2014
Recall number: 14-257

Recall Summary

Name of product:  Brita hard-sided water filter bottle for kids

Hazard:  The lid can break into pieces with sharp points, posing a laceration hazard

Consumer Contact:

Call Brita at (800) 926-2065 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or go to www.brita.com and click “Safety Recall” for more information.

Recall Details

Units  About 242,500
Description

The four recalled children’s water bottles have popular cartoon characters on a hard-sided plastic bottle. Characters and bottle colors include Dora the Explorer®, violet; Hello Kitty®, pink; SpongeBob Square Pants®, blue; and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles®, green. The bottles stand 6 inches tall, hold 15 ounces of liquid, have white lids that screw off and have fold-up straws and filters that sit inside the straw below the lid.  Each bottle bears a Brita logo and features the image of a popular children’s cartoon character. The removable plastic wrap on the bottle at time of purchase has the model number BB07 and the following UPC codes: 60258-35883 on the Dora the Explorer, 60258-35914 on the Hello Kitty, 60258-35880 on the SpongeBob Square Pants and 60258-35882 on the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

Incidents/Injuries

Brita has received 35 reports of lids breaking or cracking. No injuries have been reported.

Remedy

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled water bottles and contact Brita to receive a postage-paid shipping package to return the bottles for a full refund.

Sold at

Alaska Housewares, Associated Food Stores, Bartell Drug, C&S Wholesale Grocers, Quidsi, Royal Ahold, Shopko, Target, US Navy Exchange, Walmart Stores, and online at Amazon.com, Drugstore.com and Target.com. Hello Kitty bottles were sold from February 2014 through July 2014. Dora the Explorer, SpongeBob Square Pants and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles bottles were sold from June 2013 through July 2014. The bottles sold for about $13 to $19.

Importer

BRITA LP of Oakland, Calif.

Manufactured in

Mexico

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products under the agency’s jurisdiction. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical or mechanical hazard. CPSC's work to help ensure the safety of consumer products - such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters and household chemicals -– contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.

Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.

By contactus@napeds.com
July 01, 2014
Category: In the News
Tags: Untagged

Numbing Medications Can Harm Teething Babies, FDA Warns

Products containing lidocaine or benzocaine have been linked to serious illness and even death, agency says

THURSDAY, June 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Teething infants can come to serious harm or even death from certain "gum-numbing" medications, according to a new warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The agency said Wednesday that local anesthetics known as viscous lidocaine, or benzocaine-containing teething products, should never be used for teething children, except under the advice and supervision of a health care professional.

Viscous lidocaine contains a local anesthetic in a gel-like syrup. It requires a prescription and is typically used to treat mouth ulcers that can occur in patients undergoing chemotherapy. Parents who happen to have viscous lidocaine on hand may be tempted to use it to help teething babies, but they should not do so, the FDA said in a news release.

There have been reports of teething babies suffering overdoses of viscous lidocaine, according to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. The FDA noted that in 2014 it received 22 reports of serious incidents, including deaths, tied to use of viscous lidocaine in babies and toddlers under three and a half years of age.

According to the agency, symptoms of overdosing include confusion, jitteriness, shaking, seizures, falling asleep too easily, vision problems and vomiting.

The FDA now requires a warning on the label of all prescription oral viscous lidocaine cautioning against its use in babies and small children for teething pain.

Viscous lidocaine also "can make swallowing difficult and can increase the risk of choking or breathing in food. It can lead to drug toxicity and affect the heart and nervous system," Michael Cohen, ISMP president, said in the FDA news release.

The FDA also said that over-the-counter benzocaine products should not be used for children younger than age 2. These products include Anbesol, Hurricaine, Orajel, Baby Orajel and Orabase.

Benzocaine products for mouth and gum pain can cause a rare but serious and potentially fatal condition called methemoglobinemia, a disorder in which the amount of oxygen carried through the blood stream is greatly reduced. Children under age 2 are at particular risk, the FDA said.

In the end, parents may simply have to accept teething as an uncomfortable but transient part of infancy, experts said.

"Teething is a normal phenomenon; all babies teethe," Dr. Ethan Hausman, a pediatrician and pathologist at the FDA, said in the news release. He added that the agency "does not recommend any sort of drug, herbal or homeopathic medication or therapy for teething in children."

If a child has swollen and tender gums, you can gently massage them with your finger and give the child a cool teething ring or a clean, wet, cool washcloth to chew on, the FDA said.

"The cool object acts like a very mild local anesthetic," Dr. Hari Cheryl Sachs, a pediatrician at the FDA, said in the news release. "This is a great relief for children for a short time."

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about teething.

SOURCES: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, news releases, June 26, 2014

By contactus@napeds.com
June 17, 2014
Category: In the News
Tags: Untagged

FDA and EPA issue draft updated advice for fish consumption

For Immediate Release
June 10, 2014

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today issued draft updated advice on fish consumption. The two agencies have concluded pregnant and breastfeeding women, those who might become pregnant, and young children should eat more fish that is lower in mercury in order to gain important developmental and health benefits. The draft updated advice is consistent with recommendations in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Previously, the FDA and the EPA recommended maximum amounts of fish that these population groups should consume, but did not promote a minimum amount. Over the past decade, however, emerging science has underscored the importance of appropriate amounts of fish in the diets of pregnant and breastfeeding women, and young children.

“For years many women have limited or avoided eating fish during pregnancy or feeding fish to their young children,” said Stephen Ostroff, M.D., the FDA’s acting chief scientist. “But emerging science now tells us that limiting or avoiding fish during pregnancy and early childhood can mean missing out on important nutrients that can have a positive impact on growth and development as well as on general health.”

An FDA analysis of seafood consumption data from over 1,000 pregnant women in the United States found that 21 percent of them ate no fish in the previous month, and those who ate fish ate far less than the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends—with 50 percent eating fewer than 2 ounces a week, and 75 percent eating fewer than 4 ounces a week. The draft updated advice recommends pregnant women eat at least 8 ounces and up to 12 ounces (2-3 servings) per week of a variety of fish that are lower in mercury to support fetal growth and development.

“Eating fish with lower levels of mercury provides numerous health and dietary benefits,” said Nancy Stoner, the EPA’s acting assistant administrator for the Office of Water. “This updated advice will help pregnant women and mothers make informed decisions about the right amount and right kinds of fish to eat during important times in their lives and their children’s lives.”

The draft updated advice cautions pregnant or breastfeeding women to avoid four types of fish that are associated with high mercury levels: tilefish from the Gulf of Mexico; shark; swordfish; and king mackerel. In addition, the draft updated advice recommends limiting consumption of white (albacore) tuna to 6 ounces a week.

Choices lower in mercury include some of the most commonly eaten fish, such as shrimp, pollock, salmon, canned light tuna, tilapia, catfish and cod.

When eating fish caught from local streams, rivers and lakes, follow fish advisories from local authorities. If advice isn’t available, limit your total intake of such fish to 6 ounces a week and 1-3 ounces for children.

Before issuing final advice, the agencies will consider public comments, and also intend to seek the advice of the FDA’s Risk Communication Advisory Committeeand conduct a series of focus groups.

The public can provide comment on the draft advice and the supplemental questions and answers by submitting comments to the Federal Register docket or by participating in any public meetings that may be held. The comment period will be open until 30 days after the last transcript from the advisory committee meeting and any other public meetings becomes available. The dates of any public meetings, as well as when the public comment period will close, will be published in future Federal Register notices at www.federalregister.gov.

Here is a link to the FDA table of mercury levels in various types of fish:
http://www.fda.gov/food/foodborneillnesscontaminants/metals/ucm115644.htm



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