Northampton Area Pediatrics, LLP
193 Locust Street 
Northampton, MA 01060
413-584-8700
413-584-1714 (fax)

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Parent Resources

An online resource center providing you with additional helpful information.

 

Choosing a pediatrician is an important and personal decision and we want you to feel at ease with the care you and your child will receive.

 
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Holiday Hours
2018
New Year's Day
Monday, January 1
9:00am to 5:00pm
urgent care only
 
Martin Luther King Day
Monday, January 15
9:00am to 5:00pm
urgent care only
 
Presidents' Day
Monday, February 19
9:00am to 5:00pm
urgent care only
 
Memorial Day
Monday, May 28
9:00am to 5:00pm
urgent care only
 
Independence Day
Wednesday, July 4
9:00am to 5:00pm
urgent care only
 
Labor Day
Monday, September 3
9:00am to 5:00pm
urgent care only
 
Columbus Day
Monday, October 8
9:00am to 5:00pm
urgent care only
 
Thanksgiving Day
Thursday, November 22
9:00am to 12:00pm
urgent care only
 
Christmas Eve
Monday, December 24
8:00am to 5:00pm
 
Christmas Day
Tuesday, December 25
11:00am to 2:00pm
urgent care only
 
New Year's Eve
Monday, December 31
8:00am to 5:00pm
 

Supporting Teen Privacy

Adolescent visits to the doctor are much different from examinations for younger children. We respect that teens often have a special need for privacy and may have health questions that they would like to discuss alone. Therefore, during adolescent physicals (age thirteen years and older), we like to provide teens with the opportunity to meet with the doctor without their parent present.  As health care providers, we are ethically bound to keep information private as requested by our teenage patients.  There are limitations to this privacy, however. If we are ever worried for the immediate health and safety of any teenager, we will notify their parent or guardian.  As a general practice, a medical scribe is also in the examination room assisting the provider throughout the visit.  If you would feel more comfortable, you can request that the scribe leave at this time.

Annual Physical

During your annual physical, your parent will usually accompany you to the exam room to meet with your doctor or nurse practitioner for the initial part of your visit.  This is the time when your parent may ask any questions of special concern for your health.  Your parent then returns to the waiting room while you finish your discussion and physical examination with your provider.  This period of time is very important for you, as a young adult, to learn to independently communicate about your health concerns with your medical provider.

In order to help make adolescent provider visits more comfortable for all involved, it is helpful if the parents and teenagers have open lines of communication.  To help with registration for school sports, it is helpful for athletes to fill out a pre-participation form prior to coming in for the appointment.

All the physicians and nurse practitioners at Northampton Area Pediatrics support and encourage open communication between teenagers and their parents.  A parent knows their child better than anyone else, and will set the guiding rules and principles on their path to adulthood. But we also view ourselves as having a role in educating and helping teens make healthy choices for themselves.  Topics covered in teen visits include interests and activities, home life, school performance, dating, sex and sexuality (including abstinence and safer sex, and/or concerns around gender), substance use or experimentation, and issues around stress, moods or anxiety.  These topics are discussed universally, and we make no pre-judgments about a particular teen’s involvement (or not) with any of the above.

We also universally perform Chlamydia testing on teenage girls beginning at age 15 years.  Screening is recommended by the CDC in all sexually active teen girls and young women.  The test is performed on a urine sample that is sent to the labs. Screening is recommended since females with Chlamydia often have no symptoms of infection.  Teenage boys are tested as needed based upon symptoms.

Once a teenager turns 18 years old, he or she is now legally an adult and we are bound by law to keep all medical encounters confidential. We still encourage openness between parents and children and ask that adult patients of ours complete a “release of medical information” form so that we can continue to share information, in a limited way, with parents. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest about our services.